BLUE: The Day The Sea Changed – Become an Ocean Guardian Now

Diver Joel Gonzaga of the Philippine fishing boat 'Vergene' works in and around a skipjack tuna fishing net using just a single plastic air hose connected to a rusty compressor onboard the fishing boat at surface, 12 November 2012. Perhaps the most dangerous fishing method of all, compressor diving is known in the Philippines as 'Pa-aling' diving. According to Gonzaga, who spends months at a time on board the 'Vergene', fatal injuries and deaths occur regularly. The most common cause of death from 'Pa-aling' diving is due to decompression illness, otherwise known as 'the bends'. Dangerous fishing methods such as 'Pa-aling' are a major contributor to the overfishing crisis in and around the Philippines.
Diver Joel Gonzaga of the Philippine fishing boat 'Vergene' works in and around a skipjack tuna fishing net using just a single plastic air hose connected to a rusty compressor onboard the fishing boat at surface, 12 November 2012. Perhaps the most dangerous fishing method of all, compressor diving is known in the Philippines as 'Pa-aling' diving. According to Gonzaga, who spends months at a time on board the 'Vergene', fatal injuries and deaths occur regularly. The most common cause of death from 'Pa-aling' diving is due to decompression illness, otherwise known as 'the bends'. Dangerous fishing methods such as 'Pa-aling' are a major contributor to the overfishing crisis in and around the Philippines.
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BLUE © Transmission Films

BLUE: The Day The Sea Changed is a documentary film written and directed by Karina Holden, which takes us on a provocative journey into the ocean realm witnessing a critical moment in time as during the past forty years the oceans of the world changed both dramatically and alarmingly due to the impact of industrialisation and humankind’s selfishness.

BLUE will screen in Australia and New Zealand from October 12, 2017.  The oceans have been guardians of life on earth for hundreds of thousands of years and the film provides evidence as to why it is time to turn the tide; to bring about change for the better and the greater good by embracing hope and facing the challenges ahead.

Captured in the seas surrounding Australia, Indonesia, the Philippines and the USA, BLUE looks at how the very nature of the ocean is being altered and what is being done by a handful of people endeavouring to tackle ‘habitat destruction, species loss and pollution.

FILIPINO FISHERMEN COMPRESSOR DIVING

Filipino Fisherman compression diving. BLUE © Transmission Films

Director Karina Holden said “BLUE is like diving. It is a descent into the unknown. And it does become darker the deeper you go. But we return to the surface, with hope and where it is light. And that first breath we take at the end of the film feels restorative…

… that is why BLUE is important. We need to delve into the darkness but feel how possible it is to make change. We need a better grasp of how to live on our finite planet, but also an understanding of how the future is something we can all affect.

One of our images taken on 12 November 2012 shows ‘Diver Joel Gonzaga of the Philippine fishing boat ‘Vergene’ working in and around a skipjack tuna fishing net using just a single plastic air hose connected to a rusty compressor onboard the fishing boat on the surface.

This is perhaps the most dangerous fishing method of all… and a major contributor to the overfishing crisis in and around the Philippines’.

The official selection at the Sydney Film Festival 2017, the Melbourne International Film Festival 2017, the Brisbane International Film Festival 2017 and the NZ International Film Festival 2017 BLUE the film reveals why it is estimated that by 2050 there will be more plastic in the sea than fish.

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BLUE © Transmission Films

It is very sad to understand ‘half of all marine life has been lost’ and that ‘every piece of plastic, ever created, still exists on the planet today. Now on a precipice, the oceans of the world are no longer places of limitless resources, but have instead become ‘a dumping ground immune to change or decline’.

What an appalling prospect this appears to be for us all globally. While the plastic has been gradually ‘breaking down in ever decreasing sizes through sun exposure and the grinding of the waves and growing smaller and smaller’ it never ever goes away and this is a disaster on a monumental scale.

Did you know that ‘more than one million bags are used every minute and never used again!’

My parents and all their ancestors for thousands of years before the contemporary age, did not ever use one plastic bag. Surely that tells us all something. We have to stop being lazy and take recyclable bags to do our shopping.

Coogee BlueThis has all been hard for me to get my head around because I grew up living a gentle life by the seaside in Sydney, where my friends and I walked, swam and surfed daily in pristine crystal clear waters. It was a place of peace and freedom where I learned to love the sound of the sea and  became aware of its many moods.

They evolved from lulling me slowly to sleep as tiny waves along the seashore to becoming giant waves crashing down on the rocks, creating a symphony of sound and a reminder of nature’s awesome power.

I loved to meet the fishing boats and buy freshly filleted fish off the men in their fishing boats each morning when they came ashore. I would take it home and my mother would cook it for breakfast giving our family a wonderful start to the day.

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BLUE © Transmission Films

The facts speak for themselves.

Did You Know three billion people rely on fish to live, it is a major source of protein and populations of fish species have fallen by half.

More than half a trillion plastic pieces weighing over 250,000 tonnes are in the sea and only five per cent of the ocean is protected and only part of this, effectively managed*

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BLUE © Transmission Films

But there is hope… enterprising organisations are developing new uses for plastic, global leaders are heading the call, the governments of Venezuela, Columbia, Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia are developing six conversation corridors on land and sea.

We are all in the race to save our natural world. The question is asked. If each of us could do something to stop the decline of our ocean’s health, what would we do?

BLUE will help us to know the challenge first and how we can help by ‘defending habitats, campaigning for smarter fishing, combating marine pollution and fighting for the protection of keystone species.

Become an ocean guardian and join the global movement now

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BLUE © Transmission Films

BLUE the film about the crisis in our oceans comes at a time when the current generation are making critical decisions that will decide the legacy we leave for generations to come.

Director-producer Karina Holden grew up on the North Northern Beaches of Sydney and experiencing life in saltwater she studied science, completed a degree in Conservation Biology from University of Queensland before working on the Great Barrier Reef, the Simpson Desert and the wet tropics of Northern Australia.

While the crew and cast were filming with the release of reports by Living Blue Planet and others, they realised they had to expand their efforts and go global, hoping that the film will become an inspiration to help galvanize vital efforts.

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BLUE © Transmission Films

The BLUE Crew actively involved in filming included Producer Sarah Beard, Director of Photography Jody Muston, Underwater Cinematographer Jon Shaw, Editor Vanessa Milton and Composer Ash Gibson Greig.

Karina Holden made this feature featuring her globally marine informed colleagues, who are all passionate advocates. Ocean Guardians all they include Lucas Handley, Madison Stewart, Phillip Mango, Jennifer Lavers, Tim Silverwood, Mark Dia from Greenpeace and veteran ocean supporter Valerie Taylor.

Collectively they want everyone to know ‘our ocean has been the guardian of life on earth and now it is all of our turn to become guardians for the ocean’.

BLUE © Transmission Films

BLUE © Transmission Films

BLUE is a cinematic song for our oceans; beautiful, intimate and grand. Fearlessly truth telling, yet passionately hopeful. See this film and you will want to rise up with the waves.” – David Ritter CEO, Greenpeace Australia Pacific

Do we want our legacy to be about how we trashed our future. Will you become a guardian and help to keep the ocean clean and blue now?

It is all about the future of our children and our children’s children.

Take Action NOW

Carolyn McDowall, The Culture Concept Circle, 2017

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The Day The Sea Changed

Director Karina Holden

The film has been produced with the support of the Australian Government, Screen Australia and a raft of partners and supporters.

All images used with permission BLUE © Transmission Films

Watch the Trailer

#BlueTheFilm #OceanGuardian
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IN CINEMAS OCTOBER 12, 2017

NSW: Palace Chauvel, Palace Norton St, Palace Central, Dendy Newtown, and Avoca Beach Picture Theatre
ACT: Palace Electric
VIC: Palace Balwyn, Palace Brighton Bay, Palace Como, Palace Kino, Cinema Nova, Classic Elsternwick, Cameo Belgrave, Lido Cinema, Regent Cinema Ballarat
TAS: Hobart State
SA: Palace Nova Eastend
QLD: Palace CentroPalace Barracks
WA: Luna SXCinema Paradiso

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