Australian Brandenburg Orchestra & Dmitry Sinkovsky Re-Unite

Dmitry Sinkovsky
Sinkovsky Trio

Dmitry Sinkovsky plays with the ABO, photo by Steven Godbee

Today the measure of great art is not only about looking, but also about seeing and feeling. It demands we accept and explore the whole range of human emotion available to us.

The world of performance art offers a choice of many fashionable facades, which is reflected in the thrilling 2017 season of musical concerts on offer by the Australian Brandenburg Orchestra (ABO) in Australia.

Dmitry Sinkovsky

Dmitry Sinkovsky

When I think of Baroque I always think of the ABO, whose musicians under the guidance of dedicated artistic director Paul Dyer AO, present programs that celebrate the joy of early music magic (1600 – 1750).

In 2014 for the ABO’s 25th anniversary year the audience were treated to a truly sublime performance when Russian born countertenor and violinist Dmitry Sinkovsky was a guest artist.

Dmitry Sinkovsky

Dmitry Sinkovsky

After it was over at the time all I could think of was how all my senses were actively engaged with the rich rapturous, joyous sounds of music played by Dmitry Sinkovsky and ABO musicians.

Sinkovsky has the ability to both play and sing from the heart and he exalted art with breathtaking energy and brilliance of technique. His love of display and florid ornamentation as an aspect of music’s stylistic development won him many fans and he is in their 2017 season, returning to re-unite with the ABO on demand. Oh joy!

Sinkovsky Back to Audience

Dmitry Sinkovsky performing with the Australian Brandenburg Orchestra 2014, photo Steven Godbee

The concert Dmitry Sinkovsky: the Singing Violin will play at Sydney in the City Recital Hall July 26 – 29, August 2, and 4, in Melbourne at the Melbourne Recital Centre, August 5 and 6, and in Brisbane on Tuesday August 8, 2017. He will be bringing to Australia with him his seventeenth century Ruggieri violin, which is now on extended loan from Dutch not-for-profit Jumpstart Jr Foundation.

From modest beginnings the concerto as a musical form eventually became a composition of many parts, requiring a small orchestra to play it. ABO musicians play historically informed performances on period instruments adding to the richness of the sound.

Sinkovsky 1

Dmitry Sinkovsky performing with the Australian Brandenburg Orchestra 2014, photo Steven Godbee

Uniquely blessed, Dmitry Sinkovsky’s virtuoso violin playing is entirely electrifying as he produces sounds of such incomparable beauty you may want to weep as he elevates his performance results way above the commonplace.

Dmitry Sinkovsky 3The concert will begin with the Concerto for 4 violins Ciaconna in D Major Op26 no 3, the first French work in this genre by composer and violinist Jacques Aubert (1689-1753).

Witty and elegant with ornaments that shower the listener with confetti like stars, this concerto follows the classic line of Italian string music of the time, which became both diverting and delightful in French hands.

Sinkovsky won first prize at the “Telemann international competition” in Magdeburg, Germany in 2011 and for this concert he will play Telemann’s Concerto for Violin per Sign Pisendel in B flat Major.

Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767) composed works renowned for being ‘bold in harmonies, buoyant in rhythm and beautifully orchestrated’ so it should prove a treat.

Despite his family being opposed to him becoming a musician and being largely self taught, Telemann was held in high regard by his eighteenth century contemporaries who considered he was ‘…above all praise.’

Vivaldi BESTThere are two works by Italian maestro Antonio Vivaldi 1678-1741) on the program the Concerto for two Horns RV 538 and the Concerto for Violin in e minor RV 277 Il Favorito

Vivaldi gave rhythmic drive and vigour to all his themes, which were a triumph of structured symmetry. He brought the solo violin to prominence and in his hands the concerto became a ‘passionate fresco of dramatic contrasts’.

Baroque-instrumentsThe Concerto for Violin Op.7 No.2 in D major was composed by Jean Marie Leclair (1697-1764) who was prominent in the French violin school, dominating instrumental ensemble music of his day.

Ponytail Swinging, Russian born Demi-God the multi talented Dmitry Sinkovsky - detail photo by Steven Godbee

Ponytail Swinging, Russian born Demi-God the multi talented Dmitry Sinkovsky – detail photo by Steven Godbee

He also had an important influence on other composers seeking to reflect the time of the ‘fete galante’.

Italian composer and violinist Pietro Antonio Locatelli (1695-1764) thought to be one of the last pupils of the great master Arcangelo Corelli (1653-1713), practiced ‘virtuosity for virtuosity’s sake’ helping to extend the violin’s technical vocabulary.

Drawn to sonata and concerto forms, his works reveal elegant, expressive melodies. His Concerto Grosso Il Pianto D’Arianna in E flat Major and his Introduttioni Teattrali Op 4/5 in D Major are sure to be great highlights on what will be an outstanding evening of musical brilliance.

Be sure to secure your seats to Dmitry Sinkovsky: the Singing Violin soon.

Carolyn McDowall, The Culture Concept Circle, 2017-05-22

Australian Brandenburg Orchestra

Presents

Dmitry Sinkovsky: the Singing Violin

Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane

BUY TICKETS

 MUSIC:

Aubert Concerto for 4 violins Ciaconna in D Major Op26 no 3
Telemann Concerto for Violin per Sign Pisendel in B flat Major
Vivaldi Concerto for two Horns RV 538
Leclair Concerto for Violin Op.7 No.2 in D major

INTERVAL

Locatelli Concerto Grosso Il Pianto D’Arianna in E flat Major
Locatelli Introduttioni Teattrali Op 4/5 in D Major
Vivaldi Concerto for Violin in e minor RV 277 Il Favorito

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