Shakespeare’s Sonnets: 29 – Celebrating Inner Truth

Amanda Muggleton, Shento Gregorio and Owen O'Neil performing Works from Shakespeare and Elizabethan Songs at a Twelfth Night Supper raising funds for the completion of St John's Cathedral, Brisbane on 30th October, 2003

Amanda Muggleton, Shento Gregorio and Owen O’Neil performing Works from Shakespeare and Elizabethan Songs at a Twelfth Night Supper raising funds for the completion of St John’s Cathedral, Brisbane on 30th October, 2003

Shakespeare’s Sonnets, beloved by many, were published first in 1609, although the First Folio edition of his plays did not come out until seven years after his death in 1623.

Sonnet 29 is a speaker-focused piece of prose, that seemingly celebrates inner truth:-

When, in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes,
I all alone beweep my outcast state
And trouble deal heaven with my bootless cries
And look upon myself and curse my fate,
Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,
Featured like him, like him with friends possess’d,
Desiring this man’s art and that man’s scope,
With what I most enjoy contented least;
Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising,
Haply I think on thee, and then my state,
Like to the lark at break of day arising
From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven’s gate
For thy sweet love remember’d such wealth brings
That then I scorn to change my state with kings

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